The Office of President of the United States of America





The Office of President of the United States of America

The United States of America is governed by three bodies: the legislative, judicial and executive branches. The legislative branch is composed of the House of Representatives and the Senate. Together they make up the United States Congress. The legislative branch is charged with making laws. The judicial branch, made up a system of state and federal courts, is charged with interpreting the laws - making sure the laws are applied in the manner in which they were intended and in accordance with the United States Constitution. The Supreme Court is the highest court in the land. The executive branch of government is given the job of enforcing the laws of the United States. The President is the chief executive of the United States. The three branch system was designed so that no branch would hold too much power in the governing of the country.

The Constitution of the United States states that the president, “…shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” The president is further charged in the Constitution to “… from time to time give to the Congress information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.” While the President cannot force the Congress to act, he can suggest a program for them to consider. When his political party holds the majority of seats in Congress, he can often see that his ideas are carried out. The President can also prevent the Congress from acting by using the presidential veto.

The President plays the main role in shaping foreign policy. With the Senate’s approval, he makes treaties with other countries and appoints ambassadors. He can also make agreements with other nations without the approval of the Senate.

The President nominates Cabinet members, his closest advisors. He also nominates Supreme Court justices and many other high officials. He must get Senate approval for these, but he may fill many other important positions under his power alone. The President is Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces and commissions officers in all branches of the service.